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Academic Programs


Bachelor of Science in Information Technology

A very common question people ask is “What’s the difference between computer science and information technology?”. These differences fall into professional and curricular categories.

At the professional level, the computer scientist tends to view computing from the computer’s viewpoint. The computer scientist tends to build and extend the underlying technology, while the information technologist tends to apply available technology to solve real-world problems for people. The computer scientist tends to be motivated by the computer itself, by how it works under the hood, while the information technologist is motivated by using the computer as a tool to solve problems for people. Another way of describing the difference is that the information technologist identifies a need for technology, which the computer scientist then creates, and which the information technologist finally helps people to use effectively.

At the curricular level, information technology differs from computer science in many respects. First, there is a stronger emphasis on programming in computer science than in information technology. Information technologists certainly build software applications, and programming is certainly a critical skill in IT, but the style of programming in Information Technology differs from that in Computer Science. The typical IT project involves gluing together available components in high-level environments and providing an accessible interface to the functionality of those components provided. The typical computer science application involves writing large programs from scratch using traditional programming languages and focusing on software architecture, data structures, and algorithm development issues. Computer science also requires significantly more math and science than information technology, mainly because extending the underlying technology requires a more thorough mathematical foundation than applying that technology.

BSIT-2015.pdf

Bachelor of Science in Computer Science

A very common question people ask is “What’s the difference between computer science and information technology?”. These differences fall into professional and curricular categories.

At the professional level, the computer scientist tends to view computing from the computer’s viewpoint. The computer scientist tends to build and extend the underlying technology, while the information technologist tends to apply available technology to solve real-world problems for people. The computer scientist tends to be motivated by the computer itself, by how it works under the hood, while the information technologist is motivated by using the computer as a tool to solve problems for people. Another way of describing the difference is that the information technologist identifies a need for technology, which the computer scientist then creates, and which the information technologist finally helps people to use effectively.

At the curricular level, information technology differs from computer science in many respects. First, there is a stronger emphasis on programming in computer science than in information technology. Information technologists certainly build software applications, and programming is certainly a critical skill in IT, but the style of programming in Information Technology differs from that in Computer Science. The typical IT project involves gluing together available components in high-level environments and providing an accessible interface to the functionality of those components provided. The typical computer science application involves writing large programs from scratch using traditional programming languages and focusing on software architecture, data structures, and algorithm development issues. Computer science also requires significantly more math and science than information technology, mainly because extending the underlying technology requires a more thorough mathematical foundation than applying that technology.

Bachelor-of-Science-in-Computer-Science-BSCS.pdf

Bachelor of Library and Information Science

A very common question people ask is “What’s the difference between computer science and information technology?”. These differences fall into professional and curricular categories.

At the professional level, the computer scientist tends to view computing from the computer’s viewpoint. The computer scientist tends to build and extend the underlying technology, while the information technologist tends to apply available technology to solve real-world problems for people. The computer scientist tends to be motivated by the computer itself, by how it works under the hood, while the information technologist is motivated by using the computer as a tool to solve problems for people. Another way of describing the difference is that the information technologist identifies a need for technology, which the computer scientist then creates, and which the information technologist finally helps people to use effectively.

At the curricular level, information technology differs from computer science in many respects. First, there is a stronger emphasis on programming in computer science than in information technology. Information technologists certainly build software applications, and programming is certainly a critical skill in IT, but the style of programming in Information Technology differs from that in Computer Science. The typical IT project involves gluing together available components in high-level environments and providing an accessible interface to the functionality of those components provided. The typical computer science application involves writing large programs from scratch using traditional programming languages and focusing on software architecture, data structures, and algorithm development issues. Computer science also requires significantly more math and science than information technology, mainly because extending the underlying technology requires a more thorough mathematical foundation than applying that technology.

Master of Science in Library Information Science

MSLIS is the study of issues related to libraries. This includes academic studies (most often surveys) about how library resources are used and how people interact with library systems. These studies tend to be specific to certain libraries at certain times. The organization of knowledge for efficient retrieval of relevant information is also a major research goal of MSLIS. Basic topics in MSLIS include acquisition, cataloging, classification, and preservation.

MSLIS-Prospectus.pdf

Master of Information Technology

Admission Requirements:

  • Student entering the MIT program must have an undergraduate or industry preparation that would have exposed the student to programming concepts and skills as well as the design and operation of IT infrastructure and its components. Undergraduate preparation maybe in any of the following ITE fields: BSCS, BSIT, BSIS and its allied courses.
  • Submit recommendation to be endorsed by the person who can attest to the potential of the enrollee to undertake the graduate programs applied for:3.Submit concept paper for capstone project.Submit three(3) copies 2×2 and 2 copies 1×1 colored recent ID pictures
    1. The recommendation should be done by a former professor, Dean, or administrative head of the institution previously attended.
    2. By head of Office or immediate supervisor you are currently connected or employed if working
    3. If not employed, by any person holding a respectable position in business or a person prominent in any profession
    4. The recommendation letter should be placed inside the sealed envelope address to the The Dean, Institute of Computing, University of Southeastern Philippines, Inigo Street, Davao, Bo. Obrero, Davao City
  • Submit two(2) copies of Transcript of Record (photocopy only) and Honorable Dismissal (original) inside a sealed envelop
  • Submit two (2) pcs of long brown envelope.
  • Photocopy of Marriage Contract (for married women only)

Graduation Requirements:

  • Finished 36 units of graduate level courses broken down as follows: 12 units IT Core Courses, 18 units Specialization Courses and 6 units Capstone
  • Presented capstone project in a national or international public forum.

MIT-2015.pdf

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